Everglades Exploration Network

Mid June 2014 Paddle from Chokoloskee to Crooked Creek Chickee for Exploration up into New River

I am interested in putting together an investigative paddle mid-June based out of the Crooked Creek Chickee at the lower end of Sunday Bay to explore up into New River and to explore a few of the clearings/reported mounds on the south banks of New River.

Its probably about 5 miles from Chokoloskee to Crooked Creek (2-3 hours paddling).

I'm not sure how many can sleep on the chickee.

The idea is to leave early in the week (I'm a school teacher starting summer break), set up camp on the chickee the 1st day, then do an exploratory paddle up New River to beyond the park boundary into the preserve to identify the possibility of a dry and bug free (yeah, right!) campsite just inside the preserve.  

If found, possibly move the gear to this campsite.  If not, either way, begin the investigation of the mounds/clearings of interest that may be associated with Ft Harrell.

Let me know if you are interested.

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Jay... your tie down stakes are brilliant!

Folks... go easy on the Permethrin... no need to overdo it with that stuff. Take into consideration that the 0.5% is in solution, meaning in the water. When you dry your fabrics the water leaves, so it is much more concentrated in the fabric.

Sawyer (and the like) assumes you are going to spray it on the exterior of the cloth. Read the label!

The folks quoted above from some internet site, who made it strong then soaked all their clothes are nuts... or at least they probably will be. Permethrin was, long ago, associated with early onset dementia.

The old belief that "if a little is good, a little more should be better" is really the wrong way to think when dealing with pesticides.

Is anyone surprised about Riney? Just gotta laugh...

My wife and I have spent many summers in the glades. We use Repel #29. Recommended to us by none other than Mr. Kenny Brown in 1994. A thorough spray of ones body prior to sunset is all it takes. Happiness at the campfire for sure!

I understand all the "its too strong" and "that crap will give you cancer" but when it matters, it works.

I can't claim the tie downs. I just remembered someone had posted pictures of them on this site. They do work great!

They sell aluminum bar at Home Depot for a couple bucks so all you need is a hacksaw a drill some line and floats.

If you go to the below link and look down a couple of replies you will see a photo and description of some chickee tie downs made out of paint sticks.  I have been using these for the past three years.  I have noticed the spacing of the planks on new chickees in narrower than older ones

http://watertribe.org/forums/topic/stake-tents-on-chickee-platforms

Agree with you on the water topic.  You brought up Justin - regarding his issues with heat - he needs to change his wardrobe.  He has a pile of dark shirts, pants and even his hat that his sponsors gave him.  In my opinion the dark clothing is hurting him as much as anything.  That and leave early, quit early.

Connie Mier said:

Vivian already mentioned this, but I would like to stress it more; 6 gal of water is not enough. Figure 2 gal a day and never count on filtering as an option. Summer camping essentially doubles your water needs. Permethrin treated clothing is also essential, I think. It works! But you need to treat the clothing a couple days ahead of leaving. At least a bug jacket is also essential. And with all your battery power, Dale's advice on bringing a fan is an excellent one.

Have you heard of Justine Riney? Google Riney Ranch and learn how this guy tried to cope a week or so ago in the ten thousand islands as he attempted to begin a 5-mon exile into the glades. Didn't work. He underestimated his water needs by as much as 1 gal a day. Got to him so much he high tailed it back to Marco and holed up in an AC hotel room for a couple days.
There are a few people I know that travel the everglades and actually enjoy it in the summer. They have Bimini tops on their Kruger canoes, large tarps to set up with shade, limit mileage and travel during early morning and night. The Krugers carry a lot of weight unlike Justine's choice of using a SUP. You need larger tents, tarps, more water, battery operated fans, bug deterrants, coolers. Justine could do his but his choice of boat is IMHO what will limit him unless he opts for motorized support of food and water along the way. Unsupported would be impossible with a SUP during summer.

I believe they started with 10-37% and diluted down to ..25-.4%

that's half of Sawyer's concentration.


Gary M said:

Jay... your tie down stakes are brilliant!

Folks... go easy on the Permethrin... no need to overdo it with that stuff. Take into consideration that the 0.5% is in solution, meaning in the water. When you dry your fabrics the water leaves, so it is much more concentrated in the fabric.

Sawyer (and the like) assumes you are going to spray it on the exterior of the cloth. Read the label!

The folks quoted above from some internet site, who made it strong then soaked all their clothes are nuts... or at least they probably will be. Permethrin was, long ago, associated with early onset dementia.

The old belief that "if a little is good, a little more should be better" is really the wrong way to think when dealing with pesticides.

Is anyone surprised about Riney? Just gotta laugh...

He's done more than me around Florida, so I don't want to take anything away from Justin.

But how many times have you been somewhere you thought incredibly remote...only to find a recent footprint, campfire remains, or some other indication that you are but one in a long chain of of explorers...survivors...get awayers?

I'm sure the Miccosukkee, Seminole, and their predecessors (Archaic Indians?) who "stood up paddled"/poled to and from their homes along the Okaloacoochee Slough from the Caloosahatchee/Okeechobee area all the way down to the Turner River connection and out to the 10000 Islands for the last 5000 years would shake their heads in wonder.

Most of them did it because they had to.

Yeah, I guess I'm jealous of his apparent financial freedom and admire that it is matched with a soul who appreciates the outdoors, especially Florida...

...I just am pontificating on how we often think we are the first...

...and have been humbled by the historical records to realize that many went before us without the benefit of our self-publishing, the technology, the 911 backup, etc.

We owe a great deal to the pioneers who paved our way.  Its a debt we can only repay in respect and recall. 

I hope Justin gets back out there.

I hope he and we will help keep the public informed and appreciative of the waterfalls, rapids, villages, oyster bars, shell mounds, tree hammocks, holy and unholy sites, fish, fowl, critters, and folks (damn, I was trying for alliteration) that have been HERE through ice ages and global warmings of the past and found ways to survive and even thrive, to raise families and pass on their culture and instincts that peek through our modern world in things like "Grahams Dairy Road," "Miller Drive," "Soldiers Key," "Indians Key," "Sweetwater Creek," "Caloosahatchee," "Loxahatchee," "Fakahatchee..."

 Ita a differet ballgame for sure since the invention of personal GPS and celphone. 

Pavel:

the 2 clearings I want to visit Wednesday are the 2 lowest on this 1940 era aerial photograph of the New River.  Dale, Chris, David and I have investigated other clearings northeast of those at various times and didn't find anything too conclusive.

Lately with my job I live in the swamp for 4 to 8 months at a time and absolutely love it. Im usually out of the woods before June but I have camped in late August early Sept every year for 40 years and its the HEAT that bothers me the most. The way I see it is you can always get into a tent to escape the bugs (then spend the next several hours smashing the little buggers on the tent walls), but you must find a way to escape the sun. In my experience finding shade was top priority. Maybe you will need to make your own shade with a tarp. My friend lives on the Loop Road and to this day she refuses to use air conditioning.  The trick is to block out the sun and dont over exert yourself during the hottest periods of the day.  

The fan sure provided me with some relief to sleep at night and the noise drowns out the buzz of mosquitos, but when the heat was so bad I thought I couldnt continue, I was always able to refresh myself with a bath in fresh running swamp water. I dont know if saltwater is as invigorating. Well anyway with the strong winds and sudden rainstorms constantly twisting my poles and collapsing or blowing away my tarps, this was my final solution lol.  I hope this helps. (Actually a strong wind came along and flattened my tent even broke the fiberglass poles). Dont forget your handy pocket moon blanket. It may come in handy to reflect the rays of the sun or capture rain water.

I wish I could take the trip with you Shawn but I have no canoeing experience and I would possibly hold you back.  Hope you have a great time.

shawn beightol said:

Pavel:

the 2 clearings I want to visit Wednesday are the 2 lowest on this 1940 era aerial photograph of the New River.  Dale, Chris, David and I have investigated other clearings northeast of those at various times and didn't find anything too conclusive.

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