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River of Grass flows again into Everglades National Park

River of Grass flows again into Everglades National Park

A backhoe breaks through the roadbed of the old Tamiami Trail

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Thanks for posting this information Keith but I will believe it when I see it.  They also planned to buy out US Sugar south of Lake Okeechobee but we all know what happened there when they ran out of funds.  US Sugar is still in operation in this critical area.  I hope they follow through with the theoretical plans you have just presented. At this point the water flows a roundabout way just as I described it.

 

I realize its complicated and I certainly dont claim to be knowlegable on the subject or have any inside information. But I remember we had a hydrologist member that posted they want to keep control of the flow.(referring to the floodgate west of the Osceola camp) Maybe I misunderstood.  

could not resist posting ..

One thing I'll miss, if/when this all gets done, is the L28. I keep thinking I need to get back out there before they start degrading it, but without a real drought season this Spring I never got there.

For the paddlers... if you have not gone out L28 - give it a try. Its a very peaceful and pretty excursion even if it is a man made straight shot with a levee on the east. Its the west side that is so nice. If the wind is honking from the east it is completely protected, and the fishing (freshwater) is off the charts when water levels are at the lowest and all the fish (and critters) are forced into the canals.

Be prepared though, there are a series of plugs with a scant few inches of water that may need to be crossed on foot, but they keep most of the boats out... part of the allure. 

Yea it will be sad to lose L-28 and its wildlife. I remember how sad I was watching Paces Dike being filled in. Paces was deep and teeming with wildlife. So many gators, fish, turtles that were buried alive. We were reprimanded by the NPS for trying to save some gators. But its all necessary for the better good and the escaping gators that survived Im sure found their own way out of the upland pines back to water.

 

I wish they would leave a few water holes. Do they have to fill it in its entirety? What harm would it be to leave a few "holes" to benefit wildlife in the dry season?

The L-28 crossover is the most gator dense place I know this side of  the end of the Anhinga trail!
 
Gary M said:

One thing I'll miss, if/when this all gets done, is the L28. I keep thinking I need to get back out there before they start degrading it, but without a real drought season this Spring I never got there.

For the paddlers... if you have not gone out L28 - give it a try. Its a very peaceful and pretty excursion even if it is a man made straight shot with a levee on the east. Its the west side that is so nice. If the wind is honking from the east it is completely protected, and the fishing (freshwater) is off the charts when water levels are at the lowest and all the fish (and critters) are forced into the canals.

Be prepared though, there are a series of plugs with a scant few inches of water that may need to be crossed on foot, but they keep most of the boats out... part of the allure. 

Im going to make a point to canoe the L-28 before its gone. I used to work with a tower company and we erected the tower way down around the bend for Florida Flood Control in the early 70s. I havent really been back since. I remember how cool it was driving the levee to work everyday and getting paid for it. Several pythons were killed on the L-28 in the recent Python hunt. 

I studied the map that you posted, Keith, and read some of the link. I think my confusion comes from the recently built S-333 that provides the source of water to the One Mile Bridge. 

 

http://www.gohydrology.org/2012/05/hydrologically-connected-at-hip.... The S-333 structure was one of the first Everglades restoration projects.  I remember when it was constructed west of the Osceola camp because I drove past it all the time. The structure was built to control the flow down the L-29 canal and eventually under the 1 mile bridge. If they push down the L-29 canal levee it would seem to me to have no use. Is this expensive structure temporary? The G-3273 monitoring station is 10 miles away.

 It (monitoring station) is located in the northeast Shark River Slough portion of Everglades National Park.  Rise of water levels at G-3273 into the red zone prompts water managers to shut the S-333 gates due to flooding in developed areas adjacent to the park.  Gates are reopened when water levels at G-3273 drop into the blue zone.  Of course if they drop too low (into the gray zone) there usually isn't enough water to flow even if the gates are open

 

This knowlege prompted my comment:   "...it appears they still refuse to give up control of the water flow and push down the levees and fill in the canals"   Your comment:  "That's not true."  Well they may have plans to push down levees but it appears they still refuse to give up control.  And if they push down levees they will lose control. Maybe someone could explain. Could it be this is a temporary structure? 

 

Here  is my conversation with Robert Sobzcak. http://gladesgodeep.ning.com/forum/topics/does-distance-weaken-auth... 

 

   "They've been trying to build that bridge for over 2 decades.  But, yes, they want to control it too.  One of the problems is that on the east side of the park the levees are leaky, therefore too much water in the glades can leak over to the other side."  (Robert Sobzcak hydrologist)

 

So it appears a catch-22 unless they can find a way to strengthen the levees adjacent to the park or buy out the homeowners they cannot fill in the canals.... I remenber reading in the news that buying out these homeowners in the 10 square mile area was critical to the restoration. 

 

 

 

 

OK I found it. Its now called the 8.5 square mile area and here is the flood litigation plan.  .http://www.evergladesplan.org/docs/fs_mwd_8-5_sma_nov_2011.pdf

 

Included is a map of the current water flow under the 1 mile bridge as I described it.

 

CONVEYANCE AND SEEPAGE

The purpose of the Conveyance and Seepage Control Features (CSCF) is to reconnect freshwater flows and control seepage from west to east and out of Everglades National Park. The following features of CSCF have been constructed and are complete: Spillway structures S-355A and B in the L-29 Levee; S-333 modifications; removal of four of the nine miles of L-67 Extension Levee; Tigertail Camp raising; Pump Station S-356 between L-31N Canal and L-29 Canal; Osceola Camp elevation evaluation; and S-331 Command and Control. Currently, all funds are fully allocated to other components of the Modified Water Deliveries project. It is expected that no further modifications to levees and canals will be completed under the MWD project.

 

Dale

I don't know if you saw it, but about a year ago there was a rig that looked like a chainsaw on steroids on top of the levee over by the Krome detention center. That was a VERY interesting experiment. The cut a slot down the middle of the levee and filled it with concrete or some other non-porous substance to see if it stops the seepage. If it does, that could be expanded along the levee line. But beware, you reduce seepage from the west and the saltwater intrudes from the east...

 

 

We live on an island surrounded by water, we just don't think of it that way.  Or I guess what we really have is two peninsulas split by a river!

No I didnt see it. Its all an ongoing experiment I guess. If it doesnt work, maybe they can simply flood out the homeowners. Im sure it wont be the first time.

But like someone said its something we can feel good about. But Im aftaid by the time its all perfected, global warming will come knocking. They now realize they have to take into consideration the rising ocean. Even after they fill in the canals it will not be the same. The rock will be different underground. So maybe we need more concrete.

the question 8.5 sqr area was what partly held up restoration efforts for close to 10 years. it has been "accomodated" for, you can see it on google earth now.

please .. no more concrete!! ;)

 The concrete was a tongue and cheek comment. Yea I remember the controversy. I guess the stopgap solution, if the levees dont hold, is to pump the water out. It could be many years before they are able to give up control of the waterflow back to gravity.  Do we have spellcheck?

 

"The mitigation is to maintain conditions consistent with what existed in 1983..."   "The 8.5 SMA Flood Mitigation Plan includes acquisition of approximately 4,320 acres of land, construction of a levee, seepage canal, pump station, and detention area."

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